Movies

he film begins with Gandhi’s assassination on 30 January 1948, and his funeral. After an evening prayer, an elderly Gandhi is helped out for his evening walk to meet a large number of greeters and admirers. One of these visitors Nathuram Godse shoots him point blank in the chest. Gandhi exclaims, “Oh, God!” (“Hē Ram!” historically), and then falls dead. The film then cuts to a huge procession at his funeral, which is attended by dignitaries from around the world.

The early life of Gandhi is not depicted in the film. Instead, the story flashes back 55 years to a life-changing event: in 1893, Gandhi is thrown off a South African train for being an Indian sitting in a first-class compartment despite having a ticket. Realising the laws are biased against Indians, he then decides to start a non-violent protest campaign for the rights of all Indians in South Africa. After numerous arrests and unwelcome international attention, the government finally relents by recognizing rights for Indians, though not for the native blacks of South Africa.

 

BE GOOD, SMILE PRETTY is the emotionally powerful document of one daughter’s journey to discover the father she never knew. Director Tracy Droz Tragos was just three months old when her father died in the Vietnam War. Thirty years later, she set out on a cross-country odyssey to find out more about Lt. Don Droz, travelling from California to the U.S. Senate and all places in between in search of her father’s old war buddies (including fellow swift-boat commander, Senator John Kerry of Massachusetts). Through compelling interviews with these men, as well as family photographs, letters, home movies, and audiotapes, Tracy is finally able to know her father as more than just a soldier or a shadowy photograph on the wall. By uncovering both the painful details of her father’s death and the very qualities that made him human, Tracy allows herself and her family to understand, grieve, and cope with a painful loss that is shared by an estimated 20,000 veteran families in the U.S.

A Man for all Seasons is a play by Robert Bolt. An early form of the play had been written for BBC Radio in 1954, and a one-hour live television version starring Bernard Hepton was produced in 1957 by the BBC, but after Bolt’s success withThe Flowering Cherry, he reworked it for the stage.

It was first performed in London opening at the Globe Theatre (now Gielgud Theatre) on July 1, 1960. It later found its way to Broadway, enjoying a critically and commercially successful run of over a year. It has had several revivals, and was subsequently made into a feature film and a television movie.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Man_for_All_Seasons

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gandhi_(film)

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: